FAQ

1. Who Are the Knights of Columbus and What Do They Do?

2. How Do I Become a Knight?

3. What Are Degrees and Why Are They Important?

4. Why Do Some Knights Wear the Capes, Tuxedoes, Chapeaus, and Swords?

5. Who Are the Leaders of the Knights of Columbus?

6. What Do the Symbols and Colors on the Knights of Columbus Emblem Mean?

7. When Were the Knights of Columbus Founded?

8. Do I Have to Be Active in a Certain Number of Events or Meetings after Joining?

9. Are There Dues Involved with Being a Knight?

10. Do the Knights of Columbus Offer Fraternal Benefits?

11. Why Should I Join the Knights, I Already Belong to Another Volunteer Organization?

12. Is the Knights of Columbus a Secret Organization?

13. How can I recruit members?


Who Are the Knights of Columbus and What Do They Do?

The Knights of Columbus was founded in 1882 by Father Michael J. McGivney at St. Mary’s Church in New Haven, Connecticut.  The Knights of Columbus is a family fraternal organization of over 1.8 million Catholic men and their families, and is organized into local councils, state councils, and a supreme council.  Over 14,000 councils are currently active.  The Knights of Columbus extends throughout the United States, Canada, the Philippines, Mexico, Poland, the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Panama, the Bahamas, the Virgin Islands, Cuba, Guatemala, Guam and Saipan.

The Knights are in solidarity with the Holy Father and our Priests.  The Knights work on and contribute to service programs in the areas of Community, Family, Youth, Church, and Council.  Globally, in 2012 the Knights donated more than $158MM to charities and $1.406B in the past decade.  Knights donated nearly 70 million hours of their time to various charitable activities and over 653 million hours in the past decade.  The specific programs supported are generally determined by the local and state councils based on local needs, but all have the same purpose and that is the support of these five areas.  The core principles of the Knights of Columbus are charity, unity, fraternity, and patriotism.  We are all united in charity.

Locally, some of our St. John the Beloved Council programs and activities are briefly listed in the treasurer’s report.  Many more have been added since this report was issued.  Often, parishioners have an impression of the Knights based on one aspect they have seen, such as a KofC pancake breakfast, or KofC donation collections for those with disabilities, or our KofC color corps that they have seen at a church or civic event.  While these are some of the highly visible things we do, there is so much more that goes unseen by most people.  Much of our work goes without recognition but is very rewarding.  Supreme and State councils also get involved in large projects such as the restoration of St. Peter’s Basilica in Rome, satellite broadcasting of Vatican events, Hurricane Katrina relief, and the Hero’s Fund for victims of the 9/11 attacks.

The Knights of Columbus is an "Experience of a Lifetime."


How Do I Become a Knight?

You must be a practicing Catholic man age 18 or older to be eligible to be a Knight.  A practicing Catholic is one who is in union with the Holy See and who practices the precepts of the Catholic Church.  Men interested in joining the Knights of Columbus can do so at any time during the year.  You do not have to wait until a membership drive is held or until someone invites you to join.  You can take the initiative to join.  The first step in becoming a Knight is to contact a current Knight or membership director
and complete a membership application.  After your application is reviewed and approved by the council and admissions committee, you will attend a first degree exemplification.  Following the first degree, you are considered a council member and are welcome to attend regularly held council meetings and events.

Come see what we are all about and take the first steps to enhance your personal life. Information is available from our local council at the following link http://home.catholicweb.com/sjbkofc/files/Join_KofC.htm or from the Supreme Council at the following link http://www.kofc.org/un/en/membership/join/index.html .

Learn more about the knights by viewing the following video segments at the Supreme web site…

·       
“Why Join”…. http://www.kofc.org/un/en/membership/join/howtojoin.html (click the “video” link once the web page opens, then click on each area of interest)

·       
KofC “Video Library” has numerous examples of KofC programs…. http://www.kofc.org/un/en/videos/videolibrary.html (scroll down once the web page opens)

·       
“Experience of a Lifetime”…. http://www.kofc.org/un/en/videos/videolibrary.html#1136138497001

·       
“Founding to Future”…. http://www.kofc.org/un/en/videos/videolibrary.html#1303823024001

 


What Are Degrees and Why Are They Important?

There are four degrees in the Knights of Columbus.  They can be thought
of as lessons in charity, unity, fraternity and patriotism.  They are
meant to inspire knights to grow in their Catholic faith and to think about
these principles as they progress on their journey as knights.  The first
degree is about charity and is required before a candidate can become a
member.  The second degree is about unity.  The third degree is about
fraternity and is required before a knight is considered a full knight with the
privilege to become an officer, attend state meetings or attend supreme
conventions.  The fourth degree is about patriotism, and is required
before a knight can join an assembly or participate in the color corps. 
The color corps is the most visible organization within the Knights of
Columbus.  Although not required, many knights who have completed their
fourth degree elect to become active in the color corps.


Why Do Some Knights Wear the Capes, Tuxedoes, Chapeaus, and Swords?

This is a role reserved for fourth degree knights, and is called our color
corps
or sometimes the honor guard.  You will most often see
the color corps at civic events such as parades and wreath-laying ceremonies,
or at special church events, Masses, events involving our Bishop, and at
funerals.  Participation in the color corps is not a requirement, but many
fourth degree knights find it to be a gratifying experience.

This tradition dates back to medieval times.  Many years ago, Knights
would draw their swords and touch the heel of the handle to their chin and
extend the tip toward an honoree.  This was a sign of deep respect and was
intended to honor someone.  This gesture is still used today by the
Knights of Columbus Color Corps.  In some cases the swords are not used and
Knights will tip their Chapeaus in the same sign of respect and honor. 
This gesture of respect and honor is always given to our Lord during the
consecration of the Body and Blood during the Mass.

The capes and chapeaus can be several colors.  The colors denote
officer positions within the color corps.  Gold is reserved for the Master
of the Fourth Degree.  He is the leader of the Fourth Degree in our
state.  Green is reserved for the District Marshall who leads all color
corps in our state.   Purple is reserved for the Color Corps
Commander of each assembly.  White is reserved for the Assembly Faithful
Navigator.  Red is for all other Color Corps members.

The next time you see a color corps present at an event, you now know that
they are there as a sign of deep respect and honor.  Please thank them for
their service.


Who Are the Leaders of the Knights of Columbus?

The leader of each local council is called the Grand Knight.  The Grand
Knight and other officers of each local council are elected each Columbian year
which extends from July 1 to June 30.  The 2014-2015 Grand Knight of our
local St. John the Beloved Council is Ray McAllister.

The leader of each state council is called a State Deputy.  The State
Deputy and other officers of each state council are elected each Columbian year
which extends from July 1 to June 30.  The 2014-2015 State Deputy in the
state of Delaware is Ralph Body.

The leader of each Fourth Degree assembly is called the Faithful
Navigator.  The Faithful Navigator and other officers of each assembly are
elected each Columbian year which extends from July 1 to June 30.  The
2013-2014 Faithful Navigator of Cardinal Gibbons Assembly 150 is Mark Goldberg.

The leader of the entire order is called the Supreme Knight.  The
Supreme Knight is chosen by a Board of Directors composed of 24 members who
have been elected by the Supreme Council.  The Supreme Knight is Carl A.
Anderson.


What Do the Symbols and Colors on the Knights of Columbus Emblem Mean?

The third degree Knights of Columbus emblem is the most commonly recognized
emblem of the order.  It consists of a knight’s shield mounted on a Formee Cross.  There is also a forth degree emblem
that features the Dove, the Cross and the Globe.  Click here for more
information about these emblems.


When Were the Knights of Columbus Founded?

The Knights of Columbus was founded in 1882 by Father Michael J. McGivney in
the basement of St. Mary’s Church in New Haven, Connecticut.  The Church
is still in existence adjoining the campus of Yale University, and a council
still uses the basement of the church for its meetings.  The headquarters
of the Knights of Columbus is still located in New Haven.  St. Mary’s
Church and the Knights of Columbus museum are open to the public for
visitation.

The cause for canonization of Father McGivney was opened in 1997, and is
proceeding.  This process could lead to proclamation of sainthood for our
Order’s founder.  The title “Servant of God” is permitted to be used once
a formal cause for canonization is under way.  This title was given to
McGivney in 1997, when the Vatican granted nihil
obstat
, meaning that it had found no objection to
the advance of the formal cause for canonization. In 2008, after the Congregation
for the Causes of Saints made a positive judgment on the positio,
Pope Benedict XVI declared Father McGivney’s heroic virtue as a prelude to
possible beatification and Father McGivney was given the title, “Venerable
Servant of God.” For more information on
the life of Father Michael J. McGivney, see his biography, "Parish
Priest", by Douglas Brinkley and Julie M. Fenster.


Do I Have to Be Active in a Certain Number of Events or Meetings after Joining?

No.  This is a common misperception that unfortunately causes some busy
men to be reluctant to join the Knights of Columbus.

While all knights are encouraged to be active, there is no set
requirement.  As a Knight, you can choose the projects that you become involved
with, and you volunteer only the time you have available.  As a family
fraternal organization, the Order is dedicated to family life and the need to
balance your time with other activities.


Are There Dues Involved with Being a Knight?

Yes.  The local council collects modest annual dues from members. 
Our St. John the Beloved council dues for the 2016-2017 year are $24, and have
been the same since our founding in 1996.  The dues are used to defray
communication and administration costs by local, state and supreme councils.


Do the Knights of Columbus Offer Fraternal Benefits?

You may already be aware that the Knights of Columbus offers affordable life
insurance to its members.  Although there is no requirement to purchase
insurance from the Knights of Columbus, approximately one third of the Knights
globally have elected to have some form of insurance, annuities, disability
income insurance, or long-term care through KofC.  The Knights of 
Columbus has assured the welfare of its members since 1882 (over 125 years),
and ranks in the top 5% of the approximately 2,000 insurance companies
throughout North America.  It has consistently received the highest
possible ratings from A.M. Best (A++ Superior) and Standard & Poor’s (AAA
Extremely Strong), and is a member of the Insurance Marketplace Standards
Association (IMSA) which is reserved only for those insurance companies that
conduct business by the highest ethical standard.

There are also other benefits associated with being a Knight.  These
include scholarships, accidental death benefits, orphan benefits, etc.. 
For further information on fraternal benefits see the KofC web page at www.kofc.org .


Why Should I Join the Knights, I Already Belong to Another Volunteer Organization?

The Knights of Columbus are committed to making our community a better
place, while supporting our Church.  The Knights of Columbus also provides
an opportunity for you and your family to get to know other families in our
parish.  Families can socialize, and our events often enable other
parishioners the opportunity for fellowship also.  Being a Knight is about
much more than camaraderie, however.  It is about being involved with your
community.  It is about supporting your local Catholic Church, while
growing in your own faith.  It is also about providing security for your
family and enhancing your family life.


Is the Knights of Columbus a Secret Organization?

No.  The principles and objectives of the KofC are published and well
known.  While the Knights of Columbus council meetings are only open to
members, this is common for many private organizations.  Our meetings
follow the same format as many civic or church organizations, and use Robert’s
rules of order.  Our programs and activities are open to the public and
typically involve family members and others.  Ceremonials, such as
degrees, are the only aspect of the KofC where details are not shared. 
This is done so that candidates can fully appreciate each degree experience.


How can I recruit members?

The Order’s new Online Membership initiative is live throughout the United States and Canada!

Now you can invite eligible Catholic men to take their first step toward committed, lifelong and council-based membership in the Order by signing up online.

How does online membership work? What does it mean for degrees? Who can sign up?
Watch this brief video that explains what the program is and how it can be used as a powerful tool to help your council recruit.

We are uniquely positioned to help other men lead with faith, protect their families, serve others and defend their values. It’s now even easier to invite them to become Knights of Columbus so that they too can enjoy the same life-changing benefits and experiences that we have.

Not sure how to invite men to join? Personal invitations always work best. Talk to them. Text them. Email them. You can use the sample email below as a guide.